The Bruges Group spearheaded the intellectual battle to win a vote to leave the European Union and, above all, against the emergence of a centralised EU state.

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Bruges Group Blog

Spearheading the intellectual battle against the EU. And for new thinking in international affairs.

MoUs – the key to a smooth Brexit?

Whichever form Brexit eventually takes, whether ‘hard’ or ‘soft’; most parties would like the transition to be as painless and smooth as possible. To ensure that the Brexit process runs seamlessly, the UK and the EEA countries could agree a time-limited transition deal as a temporary ‘stepping stone’ to the final outcome.

19th December 2016

The deal need not be an official treaty but could take the form of what is called a Memorandum of understanding or MoU.

As the UK government website states:

“An MoU records international "commitments", but in a form and with wording which expresses an intention that it is not to be binding as a matter of international law. An MoU is used where it is considered preferable to avoid the formalities of a treaty – for example, where there are detailed provisions which change frequently or the matters dealt with are essentially of a technical or administrative character; in matters of defence or technology where there is a need for such documents to be classified; or where a treaty requires subsidiary documents to fill out the details. Like a treaty, an MoU can have a variety of names and can also be either in the form of an exchange of notes or a single document. However, the formalities which surround treatymaking do not apply to it and it is not usually published. Confusingly some treaties are called memoranda of understanding. Although an MoU is not legally binding it should be no less carefully drafted than if it were a treaty, given that it is always the intention to perform all HMG's commitments, whether legally binding or not.”[1]

An MoU is an established device In public international law; less official that a treaty but more than a gentleman’s agreement. MoU’s can take various forms and can serve wildly different purposes. They can be short and cover one specific issue or be lengthy, covering a range of topics.

Examples include the Memorandum of Understanding on Trade and Investment (MOUTI) Between the Government of Canada and the Governments of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua[2] and the Memorandum of Understanding between the Council of Europe and the European Union[3]

While they lack the legal certainty of treaties, the semi-official nature of MoUs means that one (or several relating to different areas of co-operation) could likely be signed quickly, without extensive consultation, parliamentary chicanery or ratification delays – as opposed to a potentially lengthy Free Trade Agreement (FTA) ratification.

These interim documents could help avoid a potential ‘cliff edge’ scenario as the 2 year article 50 period draws to a close in 2019.

Once agreed, the document (or documents) should be signed by the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs on behalf of Her Majesty's Government, representatives of the European Council and European Commission (including the High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy) on behalf of the EU and a representative from the EEA Council.

The text of the ‘deal’ should be officially sent to the FCO Treaty Section, The European Commission and The EEA Council. We would then receive their signed copies in exchange, under the established procedure of international law called ‘Exchange of Letters/Notes’.

As a sign of good faith, the MoU(s) (signed by all parties) could then be deposited with the Secretary-General of the United Nations. This would not make the document any more or less binding, but it would be a show of good faith and would reassure businesses and concerned groups that all sides were committed to a stable transition. MoU’s could therefore go a long way towards bridging the gap between our current EU membership and our final negotiated arrangement.

Below is a brief outline of what we believe the UK-EEA MoU could look like.

Memorandum of Understanding

The purpose of this Memorandum of Understanding (hereinafter referred to as "MoU") is to maintain co-operation and secure free trade in goods and services between the signatories of the European Economic Area (EEA) agreement and the UK.

This MoU is intended to maintain where possible the Status quo ante in terms of trade until a more permanent agreement can be reached between the Parties. 

This Memorandum of Understanding is not legally binding on the Parties. This MoU is agreed in good faith between the signatories, on the basis that it is a fair and honest representation of their intentions.

Duration and Term

This agreement is intended to last for a period of two years from the date of signature. It may be renewed once, for a period of 12 months if all Parties agree.

 

 

Memorandum of Understanding on Trade and co-operation between the United Kingdom and the EEA

BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND, OF THE ONE PART, AND THE SIGNATORIES OF THE EEA AGREEMENT:

[THE KINGDOM OF BELGIUM, THE REPUBLIC OF BULGARIA, THE CZECH REPUBLIC, THE KINGDOM OF DENMARK, THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY, THE REPUBLIC OF ESTONIA, IRELAND, THE HELLENIC REPUBLIC, THE KINGDOM OF SPAIN, THE FRENCH REPUBLIC, THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA, THE ITALIAN REPUBLIC, THE REPUBLIC OF CYPRUS, THE REPUBLIC OF LATVIA, THE REPUBLIC OF LITHUANIA, THE GRAND DUCHY OF LUXEMBOURG, HUNGARY, THE REPUBLIC OF MALTA, THE KINGDOM OF THE NETHERLANDS, THE REPUBLIC OF AUSTRIA, THE REPUBLIC OF POLAND, THE PORTUGUESE REPUBLIC, ROMANIA, THE REPUBLIC OF SLOVENIA, THE SLOVAK REPUBLIC, THE REPUBLIC OF FINLAND, THE KINGDOM OF SWEDEN, ICELAND, THE PRINCIPALITY OF LIECHTENSTEIN, THE KINGDOM OF NORWAY], OF THE OTHER PART, hereafter jointly referred to as the “Parties”:

RECOGNISING the longstanding alliances between the UK and the nations of Europe;

COMMITTED to renewing their close and lasting relationship that is based on common values, namely respect for democratic principles, the rule of law, good governance and free and fair trade;

DESIRING to maintain currently high levels of trade and investment and seeking to avoid future barriers to mutual trade and investment;

RECOGNISING that UK as a European country shares a common history and common values with the Member States of the European Union (EU) and the member states of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA);

RECOGNISING the importance of International trade and economic cooperation;

COMMITTED to combating organised crime and money laundering, to reducing the supply of and demand for illicit drugs and to stepping up cooperation in the fight against terrorism;

HAVING REGARD to the outcome of the 23rd June 2016 UK Referendum on EU membership;

BUILDING on their respective rights and obligations under the Marrakesh Agreement Establishing the World Trade Organisation, done on 15 April 1994 (hereinafter referred to as the ‘WTO Agreement’) and other multilateral, regional and bilateral agreements and arrangements to which they are party;

HAVE AGREED as follows:

CHAPTER I:

ARTICLE 1 DEFINITIONS

General definitions

For the purposes of this Agreement and unless otherwise specified:

GATS means the General Agreement on Trade in Services, contained in Annex 1B to the WTO Agreement;

GATT 1994 means the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1994, contained in Annex 1A to the WTO Agreement;

Parties means, on the one hand, the European Union or its Member States or the European Union and its Member States within their respective areas of competence as derived from the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (hereinafter referred to as the 'EU Party'), and on the other hand, the UK;

TBT Agreement means the Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade, contained in Annex 1A to the WTO Agreement;

TRIPS Agreement means the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, contained in Annex 1C to the WTO Agreement;

UK-EEA Joint Committee means the UK-EEA Joint Committee established under Article 5.1 (The UK-EEA Joint Committee);

Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties means the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, done at Vienna on 23 May 1969;

WTO means the World Trade Organization; and

WTO Agreement means the Marrakesh Agreement Establishing the World Trade Organization, done on 15 April 1994.

ARTICLE 2 OBJECTIVES

1. The Parties hereby establish a free trade area on goods, services, establishment and associated rules in accordance with this Agreement.

2. The objectives of this Memorandum of Understanding (hereinafter referred to as "MoU") are:

(a) to liberalise and facilitate trade in goods between the Parties, in conformity with Article XXIV of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1994 (hereinafter referred to as ‘GATT 1994’);

(b) to liberalise trade in services and investment between the Parties, in conformity with Article V of the General Agreement on Trade in Services (hereinafter referred to as ‘GATS’);

(c) to provide appropriate protection of intellectual property rights, in accordance with the highest international standards, in conformity with TheAgreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights(hereinafter referred to as ‘TRIPS’);

(d) to work to reduce non-tariff barriers between the parties, in conformity with the Technical Barriers to Trade (‘TBT’) Agreement;

(e) to promote peace and security for all Europeans.

Article 3 Relation to the WTO Agreement and other agreements

The Parties affirm their rights and obligations with respect to each other under the WTO Agreement and other agreements to which they are party.

Article 4 Customs duties

No new customs duty on imports shall be introduced in trade between the EEA states and the UK. Parties shall not institute any new taxes or other measures having an equivalent effect imposed on, or in connection with, the exportation of goods to the territory of each other.

Article 5 Joint Committee - establishment

1. A UK-EEA joint committee is hereby established, which shall be responsible for the administration of the agreement and shall ensure its proper implementation. For this purpose, it shall make recommendations and take decisions in the cases provided for in the agreement. These decisions shall be put into effect by the contracting parties in accordance with their own rules.

2. For the purpose of the proper implementation of the agreement the contracting parties shall exchange information and, at the request of either party, shall hold consultations within the joint committee.

3. The joint committee shall adopt its own rules of procedure.

Article 6 Joint Committee - constitution

1. The joint committee shall consist of representatives of the EEA and its signatory states, on the one hand, and of representatives of the UK, on the other.

2. The joint committee shall act by mutual agreement.

3. The joint committee shall meet at least twice a year in order to review the general functioning of the agreement, with the meetings alternating between Brussels/Strasbourg and London.

4. The joint committee shall, in addition meet whenever special circumstances so require, at the request of either contracting party, in accordance with the conditions to be laid down in its rules of procedure.

5. Each contracting party shall preside in turn over the joint committee, in accordance with the arrangements to be laid down in its rules of procedure.

6. The joint committee may decide to set up any working party that can assist it in carrying out its duties.

Article 7 political dialogue

1.       The parties shall hold, by mutual agreement regular meetings at Foreign Minister level.

2.       The parties shall take full and timely advantage of all diplomatic channels between the Parties, including within the United Nations (and specifically the UNECE), the Council of Europe, the OSCE and other international fora, to work towards resolution of shared problems.

3.       Other procedures and mechanisms for political dialogue, including extraordinary consultations, shall be set up by the Parties by mutual agreement.

Article 7 Combating crime and terrorism

1.       The Parties agree to work together at bilateral, regional and international levels to prevent and combat crime and terrorism in accordance with national and international law.

2.       The main focus and instrument of this co-operation shall be via INTERPOL

3.       The UK shall sign an operational agreement with EUROPOL

4.       The Parties agree to co-operate closely via the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (‘UNODC’) and World Customs Organization(WCO).

5.       The Parties agree to exchange information on terrorist groups and their support networks;

Article 8 Facilitating trade

1.       The Parties agree to work closely on customs matters in order to facilitate legitimate trade and to ensure the integrity of supply chains.

2.       The contracting parties also recognize the need for minimizing the incidence and complexity of import and export formalities and for decreasing and simplifying import and export documentation requirements.

3.       The Parties agree to work closely to minimize difficulties caused by rules of origin (ROO) and that on the importation of products from the territory of a contracting party into the territory of another contracting party, the production of certificates of origin should only be required to the extent that is strictly indispensable.

Final Clauses

1. This Memorandum of Understanding may be amended by the written concurrence of all Parties.

2. The Memorandum of Understanding comes into effect upon signature and will remain in effect unless terminated by consensus. Any Party may withdraw from this Arrangement with previous written notification, twelve months in advance to the other Parties.

Authentic texts

This Agreement is drawn up in duplicate in the Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Maltese, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish, Icelandic and Norwegian languages, each of these texts being equally authentic.

This agreement will be approved by the contracting parties in accordance with their own procedures.

Done at Brussels on the first day of May in the year two thousand and nineteen.

For the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland:

Für die Bundesrepublik Deutschland / For the Federal Republic of Germany:

Thar cheann Na hÉireann / For Ireland:

For the European Union / Pour l'Union européenne:

For the EEA Council: 

References:

 


[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/293976/Treaties_and_MoU_Guidance.pdf

[2] http://www.international.gc.ca/trade-agreements-accords-commerciaux/agr-acc/other-autre/ca-ac.aspx?lang=eng

[3] https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/mou_2007_en.pdf

 

 

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Comments 2

 
Guest - Peter Gardner on Thursday, 29 December 2016 00:19

I have been arguing for some time that a series of agreements in MoU's, Heads of Agreement or exchanges of letters should constitute the framework of a future relationship with the EU as per Article 50. This would not be constrained by the two year limit that applies to arrangements for withdrawal and avoids being bogged down in detail and trivia. This would enable the essential matters of withdrawal - agreement on assets and liabilities, cases before the ECJ, directives and regulations in the pipeline, rights of residence etc - to be agreed quickly and thereby establish good will and create certainty for individuals and businesses.
As far as I know Mrs May intends two omnibus treaties, one on withdrawal and the other on the new relationship. There are now signs that she has at last recognised the impossibility of concluding the latter within two years - although a take-it-or-leave-it free trade deal should be included in Britain's offer to the EU. Success in negotiation is better assured by agreeing quickly where one can and gradually leading up to the most difficult issues and above all, not allowing oneself to be boxed in by false deadlines especially of one's own creation. Her pre-occupation with a new treaty of association is likely to mean the true issues on withdrawal are neglected, and the deal will not in the long term be in Britain's interests. Britain should instead concentrate on becoming a sovereign nation once again and re-learn how to govern itself, allow the EU also to develop independently of Britain, and only then, after a period of years, consider any new formal treaty of entanglement in the EU.

I have been arguing for some time that a series of agreements in MoU's, Heads of Agreement or exchanges of letters should constitute the framework of a future relationship with the EU as per Article 50. This would not be constrained by the two year limit that applies to arrangements for withdrawal and avoids being bogged down in detail and trivia. This would enable the essential matters of withdrawal - agreement on assets and liabilities, cases before the ECJ, directives and regulations in the pipeline, rights of residence etc - to be agreed quickly and thereby establish good will and create certainty for individuals and businesses. As far as I know Mrs May intends two omnibus treaties, one on withdrawal and the other on the new relationship. There are now signs that she has at last recognised the impossibility of concluding the latter within two years - although a take-it-or-leave-it free trade deal should be included in Britain's offer to the EU. Success in negotiation is better assured by agreeing quickly where one can and gradually leading up to the most difficult issues and above all, not allowing oneself to be boxed in by false deadlines especially of one's own creation. Her pre-occupation with a new treaty of association is likely to mean the true issues on withdrawal are neglected, and the deal will not in the long term be in Britain's interests. Britain should instead concentrate on becoming a sovereign nation once again and re-learn how to govern itself, allow the EU also to develop independently of Britain, and only then, after a period of years, consider any new formal treaty of entanglement in the EU.
Robert Oulds on Tuesday, 03 January 2017 20:00

Thank for your comment. Very helpful. If he EU decides that the withdrawal agreement needs to have the status of an Association Agreement before coming into force then its ratification will need the approval of EU member states Parliaments. That will take time. We do therefore need other ways to speed up the process.

Thank for your comment. Very helpful. If he EU decides that the withdrawal agreement needs to have the status of an Association Agreement before coming into force then its ratification will need the approval of EU member states Parliaments. That will take time. We do therefore need other ways to speed up the process.
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Wednesday, 29 March 2017