The Bruges Group spearheaded the intellectual battle to win a vote to leave the European Union and, above all, against the emergence of a centralised EU state.

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Bruges Group Blog

Spearheading the intellectual battle against the EU. And for new thinking in international affairs.

Bordering on Madness

The thing that first drew me to being opposed to our membership of the EU in 1991 was the realisation my elected Government was not in control of our country, that authority had passed to an offshore, unelected and unaccountable body. 

My awakening came through a letter written to the Chancellor of the Exchequer during the terrible recession of the early 1990's. He had increased VAT from 15% to 17.5%, which for the small family business I ran, was a disaster. I asked him to consider reducing VAT to around 8% to 10% to give struggling businesses like ours a fighting chance during those tough economic times. The reply shocked me. 

In the correspondence to me the Chancellor's office stated that as we were members of the EU the Chancellor was not allowed to reduce VAT below 15%. This admission of a loss of power, from the office of an important member of Government, elected into alleged power by the British electorate, came like an electric shock, in that moment, reading those words, I realised we no longer lived in a free democratic nation. My long journey for democracy and sovereignty started there. 

This now brings me to today, as that journey is coming towards what I hope to be a successful close. Seeing what is now happening with the current negotiations and how the EU is determined to be as obstructive as possible, the situation regarding the border between the North & South of Ireland is a classic case of all that is wrong with the EU, so much so it screams to me and yet others can't, or refuse to see it. 

On the 29th March 2019 Britain will leave the EU and return to full democracy and self determination, whereas Eire will remain trapped in the clutches of the EU, what better example of the difference between a free, self determining nation and a captive EU nation can there be. Britain will be free to make mutually beneficial agreements with other nations while Eire will not. 

We all know there should be no obstacle between old friends who have had close and happily mutual arrangements with each other for decades, but Eire is trapped by EU dogma and intransigence. Were Eire to be a free from the EU's clutches our two nations could quickly decide a happy and workable agreement on the border, from 2019 without outside interference. The UK will be in that blissful position but Eire will not, the resulting shambles will once again be down to the EU creating problems where none should exist. Maybe this will make the Government of Southern Ireland realise the advantages of leaving the EU and join us in our return to freedom just as they did in 1973 when we joined the then Common Market together, to remain in the EU is bordering on madness.

By: Derek Bennett, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Sunday, 17 December 2017