The Bruges Group spearheaded the intellectual battle to win a vote to leave the European Union and, above all, against the emergence of a centralised EU state.

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Bruges Group Blog

Spearheading the intellectual battle against the EU. And for new thinking in international affairs.

The EU Empire

The best laid schemes o' mice an' men

Gang aft agleyi - Robert Burns


After the Second World War and such heavy losses for the Allies, it was perhaps in the interests of their respective peoples for the European Union to develop. The main purpose of which was to limit the circumstances for a resurgence of war. The ideal that was proposed was indeed a noble one. In 1957 the EEC was born.


Like any Empire from the Byzantine, Roman to Mongol Empire, the EEC aimed to unify not just a geographical area, but also a demographic one. This community evolved into the EU in the early 90's. What has resulted is arguably not the high ideal of a unified Europe, but a fragmented one where unchecked terror cells have been permitted to enter without scrutiny. Whether it is rape gangs, terror cells or organised crime, there is no doubt that an increase in crime has resulted from this flawed policy. The rhetoric of the EU is that whatever the cost to nation members, whatever the cost to their populations, the Schengen Zone must remain.


It is foolhardy of the European Presidents to ignore history and these obvious signs of failed fiscal and social policies. The result has seen a rise of anti-EU parties in France, Italy and beyond. Some within the European Commission argue this is just a fad or a populist dream. Yet, such a simple label ignores how voters appoint those they admire to lead them. Such votes and voters have been ridiculed by keen Remain campaigners like Lord Adonis and Nick Clegg.


The premise of the EU it may be argued is to model Empire building in a modern environment. Amalgamating over 20 countries from central hubs in Brussels and Strasbourg, has led to diplomatic and political tensions since its creation. Like previous models of Empire, the EU appears to be repeating the same mistakes of its fore-bearers. Indeed if we consider the earliest signs of change, Norway left in 1994, a year after Maastricht. The struggles that the EU faces are largely self-imposed. If the EU stuck to its core principle of treating member states equally then this problem may diminish in time. Yet, there is an evidential difference between Western Europe and Eastern Europe, between Southern Europe and Northern Europe and how these member states are treated by the EU government.


Brussels cannot erase the occupation of Eastern Europe by the Soviets or the psyches that developed as a result. The likes of President Juncker and Donald Tusk cannot undo the many years they failed to dedicate to addressing this issue. There will be some who argue that the EU is a success. Yet, when measured against the Empires of the past, the evidence is clear. PESCO confirms that the EU has become a military Empire.


What happened to the Byzantine Empire? Or the Roman Empire? And the Mongol Empire? Inevitably they all failed as they sowed the seeds of their own destruction. Will the EU Empire fare any better? Time will tell.




iThe best laid plans of mice and men often go wrong.

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Thursday, 18 January 2018