The Bruges Group spearheaded the intellectual battle to win a vote to leave the European Union and, above all, against the emergence of a centralised EU state.

NOTE! This site uses cookies and similar technologies.

If you not change browser settings, you agree to it. Learn more

I understand

Cookies are a technology which we use to provide you with tailored information on our website. A cookie is a piece of code that is sent to your internet browser and is stored on your system.

Please see below for a list of cookies this website uses:

Cookie name: _utma, _utmb, _utmc, _utmz

Purpose: Google Analytics cookies. Google Analytics is software that lets us analyse how visitors use our site. We use this information to improve our website and provide the best experience to visitors.

Function: These cookies collect data in an anonymous form. Please see Google's privacy policy for further information. To opt out of these cookies, please visit Google's website.

Cookie name: Sitecore

Purpose: Stores information, such as language and regional preferences, that our content management system (the system we use to update our website) relies on to function.

Function: This is a session cookie and will be destroyed when you close your browser. This cookie is essential for our website to function.

Cookie name: ASP.net_session

Purpose: Allows the website to save your session state across different pages. For example, if you have completed a survey, the website will remember that you have done so and will not ask you to complete it again when you view another page on the website.

Function: This is a session cookie and will be destroyed when you close your browser. This cookie is essential for our website to function.

Cookie name: website#sc_wede

Purpose: Indicates whether the user's browser supports inline editing of content. This indicates whether our content management system will work for our website administrators in their internet browsers.

Function: This is a session cookie and will be destroyed when you close your browser. This cookie is essential for our website to function.

Cookie name: redirected

Purpose: Remembers when the site forwards you from one page to another, so you can return to the first page. For example, go back to the home page after viewing a special 'splash' page.

Function: This is a session cookie, which your browser will destroy when it shuts down. The website needs this cookie to function.

Cookie name: tccookiesprefs

Purpose: Remembers when you respond to the site cookie policy, so you do not see the cookie preferences notice on every page.

Function: If you choose to remember your preference with a temporary cookie, your browser will remove it when you shut it down, otherwise the cookie will be stored for about a year.

Cookie name: _ga

Purpose: Additional Google Analytics cookie. Google Analytics is software that lets us analyse how visitors use our site. We use this information to improve our website and provide the best experience to visitors.

Function: These cookies collect data in an anonymous form. Please see Google's privacy policy for further information.

Cookie name: SC_ANALYTICS_GLOBAL_COOKIE, SC_ANALYTICS_SESSION_COOKIE

Purpose: Sitecore Analytics is software that lets us analyse how visitors use our site. We use this information to improve our website and provide the best experience to visitors.

Function: These cookies collect data in an anonymous form. When you close your browser, it will delete the 'session' cookie; it will keep the 'global' cookie for about one year.

Facebook cookies

We use Facebook 'Like' buttons to share site feedback. For further information, see Facebook's cookie policy page.

Twitter cookies

We use Twitter 'Tweet' buttons to share site feedback. For further information, see Twitter's privacy statement.

YouTube cookies

We embed videos from our official YouTube channel. YouTube uses cookies to help maintain the integrity of video statistics, prevent fraud and to improve their site experience. If you view a video, YouTube may set cookies on your computer once you click on the video player.

Cookies pop-up

When you close the cookies pop-up box by clicking "OK", a permanent cookie will be set on your machine. This will remember your preference so that the pop-up doesn't display across any pages whenever you visit the website.

Opting out/removing cookies

To opt out of Google Analytics cookies, please visit Google’s website.

You can also control what cookies you accept through your internet browser. For details on how to do this, please visit aboutcookies.org. Please note that by deleting our cookies or disabling future cookies you may not be able to access certain areas or features of our website.

mailing list
donate now
join now
shop

Bruges Group Blog

Spearheading the intellectual battle against the EU. And for new thinking in international affairs.

A Historian’s Vision: Post Brexit Britain Will Be Kind and Caring

Britain's exit from the European Union, ushered by a majority of Leave votes, is an opportunity to build a better Britain.

Not a better Britain, according to historian Bess Rhodes, but a kind and more caring Britain.

Speaking at the Bruges Group's "Deal or No Deal" conference on Nov. 4, Rhodes admitted she voted to remain in the EU. After the results of the referendum, she reflected on the possibilities offered by the vote.

Much of the coverage on Brexit is divisive and unkind towards Leave voters. Yet, the EU's response to U.K.'s free and fair election to Leave is even more shocking, Rhodes said.

She began understanding the Leave decision in a new light. Voters were calling for a stronger society, a healthcare system capable of caring for the sick and the weak. Brexit allows additional funding for the NHS, designed to tend to the wellbeing of its community.

"The EU is at its worst, most bureaucratic and narrow minded," Rhodes said. "Rather than the money going to Brussels, [voters] wanted it to go to the weakest, most disadvantaged members of society."

The U.K. will be able to put in place more positive relationships with other countries after leaving the EU. Brussels restrains the way Britain interacts with nations such as the Commonwealth. 

Finally, Brexit signals a chance to revitalize our relationship with the environment, Rhodes said. Brussels dictates U.K.'s policies towards land and fishing. It's too far removed from the on-the-ground reality.

"It was ordinary people who brought Brexit, it wasn't by people in power," Rhodes said. "It is the ordinary people who should shape it."



Fast Forward to 2020: U.K. Needs to Speed Up Brexi...
Here's Why U.K. Should Prepare for "No Deal" on Br...
 

Comments 1

Guest - Ray Rogers on Monday, 13 November 2017 21:49

The working classes have saved this country's sovereignty and its right to self determination.The so called educated middle classes would have given it away because they are so narrow minded they would rather sell their country out than admit that us plebs may just be right.

The working classes have saved this country's sovereignty and its right to self determination.The so called educated middle classes would have given it away because they are so narrow minded they would rather sell their country out than admit that us plebs may just be right.
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Tuesday, 21 November 2017